News from NDOW

Las Vegas Fourth Grader Wins Free Fishing Day Poster Contest

When Adalay Pèrez, fourth grader at Wayne Tanaka Elementary in Las Vegas, was working on her entry for this year’s Free Fishing Day Poster Contest she wanted to include things that showed how much she loved her home state of Nevada. So after she drew a nice picture of two people catching fish, she added a desert bighorn sheep, the state animal of Nevada, and a mountain bluebird, the state bird of Nevada. “I wanted to represent the state,” she would tell her teacher.  Well now her picture will “represent the state” as the winner of the 2018 Nevada Free Fishing Day Poster Contest. Her artwork will be used for NDOW’s Free Fishing Day poster, which is sent to all of the schools in the state as well as NDOW offices as a reminder about Free Fishing Day. Her work will also be displayed in the 2018 Nevada Fishing Guide.   Free Fishing Day will take place on Saturday, June 9. The statewide event allows anglers to fish any public fishing water in the state without a fishing license or trout stamp, while all limits and other regulations apply. Visit www.ndow.org to find out more about Free Fishing Day events taking place locally.  While Pèrez was very excited to find out she had won, reportedly running outside to tell all of her friends on the playground, her teacher might have been even more thrilled. “I was so excited I was jumping up and down,” said Erica Jordan, fourth grade teacher at Tanaka Elementary. “She is a good student and an incredible artist. She worked very hard on her picture, so this is very well deserved.”   Jordan was doubly excited when she learned that another student in her class, fourth grader Anna Karen Villalobos, had placed third in this year’s contest as well. “I cannot believe that two of my students placed in the top three in the state,” she said. “I feel so excited and thrilled to have my students be in the top.  Anna Karen and Adalay are very good girls. This is the perfect award for them.”  Second place in the contest was claimed by fifth grader Rebekah Fuerniss from Fay Galloway Elementary in Henderson. Fuerniss and Villalobos will both receive a fishing rod and reel for placing in the top three. As the winner, Pèrez will receive a framed copy of her artwork as well as a fishing rod and reel. She and her family will also be treated to a guided fishing outing.  The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


Big Game Tag Application Deadline Fast Approaching!

The Nevada Department of Wildlife wants to remind sportsmen who have not yet applied for this year’s big game draw that the deadline is fast approaching. All applications must be received by 11 p.m. on Monday, April 16.

Big Game Tag Application Deadline Fast Approaching(2)

The Nevada Department of Wildlife wants to remind sportsmen who have not yet applied for this year’s big game draw that the deadline is fast approaching. All applications must be received by 11 p.m. on Monday, April 16.  Nevada offers a variety of big game opportunities for deer, elk, bear, pronghorn antelope, mountain goat and bighorn sheep.  The Silver State is one of just a few states to possess three sub-species of bighorn sheep (desert, rocky mountain and California).   NDOW has made several improvements this year, including launching a new, streamlined purchasing system (ndowlicensing.com) that focuses on web and mobile platforms and simplifying the license options which include all state stamps. With this new system, sportsmen now have a more modern, simpler, and convenient way to purchase their licenses online and at license agents. Sportsmen are now able to download their licenses to their mobile devices and print them from home.  Customers are urged to login and claim their account and submit applications early to avoid missing the deadline.  Any and all questions about creating your account or submitting applications can be answered by calling 1-855- 542-6369.  The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


Multiple Suspects Charged in Year-Long Bear Poaching in Investigation

Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) game wardens recently wrapped up a complicated year-long investigation into the poaching of a large male black bear in the spring of 2017, resulting in formal charges being filed in Dayton Justice Court March 28 by the Lyon County District Attorney’s Office.  After being alerted to the possible unlawful killing of a large black bear in the Pine Nut Mountains near Dayton, NV in February of 2017, game wardens began what was to become a nearly year-long investigation into the matter. During the investigation wardens uncovered information which suggested that Daniel Rubio, Eliseo Rubio Sr. and Eliseo Rubio Jr. of Dayton, may have been involved with the unlawful shooting and killing of the black bear, as well as unlawfully killing and possessing a mule deer in addition to other wildlife crimes.  Enough evidence was produced to charge the suspects with felony unlawful killing of a big game animal as well as gross misdemeanor unlawful possession of a big game animal.  “This was a lengthy and complicated investigation in which patience, persistence, and confidentiality were crucial to the eventual success,” said Nevada Department of Wildlife Chief Game Warden Tyler Turnipseed. “Key evidence in this case minimized our reliance on additional information from the public or offering rewards while investigating this case.”   Based on the unique circumstances of all poaching cases, game wardens investigate each case differently. In some investigations, NDOW solicits information from the public and even offers reward money for tips that lead to solving the case. In this investigation, the suspects were identified from the beginning. NDOW law enforcement believes their relatively quiet persistence in this case worked to their advantage.   “Not having media exposure during the investigation helped protect key pieces of evidence,” said NDOW Game Warden Jake Kreamer. “Keeping things confidential allowed us the time to conduct a very thorough investigation and put together what we believe is a solid case.”  “We want to make it very clear that these individuals are not hunters. They did not have big game tags, did not purchase hunting licenses, and are not hunters. People like this are definitely not sportsmen," said Turnipseed.  Poaching is a global issue, and the impacts of a case like this go beyond Nevada. NDOW is extremely grateful Nevada wardens were able to bring these poachers to justice and highlight the tragic loss of wildlife that belongs to us all.   Witnesses to any wildlife-related crime are encouraged to report information to Operation Game Thief at (800) 992-3030.  The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, conserves, manages and restores wildlife and its habitat for the aesthetic, scientific, educational, recreational, and economic benefits to citizens of Nevada and the United States, and to promote the safety of persons using vessels on the waters of Nevada. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


Silver State Tag Offers Hunt of a Lifetime and More

Describing the Silver State Tag is a lot like watching one of those late night infomercials. With all the extra gear and services a person can win, you are constantly saying the phrase, “but wait, there’s more!”  The Silver State Tag, open to both resident and nonresident hunters, already allows sportsmen the opportunity to hunt one of four big game species (mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk, Nelson (desert) bighorn sheep and pronghorn antelope) anywhere in the state, even if you are in a waiting period for the species available. Add onto that the fact that winners also walk away with thousands of dollars’ worth of hunting gear and services and you are talking about an opportunity you simply cannot pass up.  The prizes include the following:   Desert Bighorn Sheep:   Sitka gear and Kenetrek boots (Wild Sheep Foundation) Razor HD 20-65x85 spotting scope and 15x50 Viper HD binoculars (Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn) Rifle and scope (Nevada Bighorns Unlimited) Multiple guide services (Deep Creek Outfitters and White River Guide Service) Shoulder mount, (Artistic Wildlife Taxidermy) Yeti Cooler (Elko Bighorns Unlimited) Back pack (NBU-Midas Chapter) Minimalist hunting pack and hat (Cabela’s) Hydrate and Recover / Energy and Focus sports drinks (Wilderness Athlete)  Elk:   Browning A-bolt 7mm (Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation – Ely Chapter) Razor HD 20-60x85 spotting scope, 15x50 Viper HD binoculars, Skyline Tripod (includes fluid head) Ranger 1000 Laser Rangefinder (Vortex) Shoulder mount (Trophy Room Services) 40 qt. Orca cooler (C&B Auto/Napa – Ely) Guide DCS jacket & Attack pant, ICON Cap and Guide gloves (KUIU) Alaskan frame pack and hat (Cabela’s) Hydrate and Recover / Energy and Focus sports drinks (Wilderness Athlete) $500 gift card (Sportsworld - Ely)   Mule Deer:   Razor HD 20-60x85 spotting scope, 15x50 Viper HD binoculars, Skyline tripod (includes fluid head) and Ranger 1000 Laser Rangefinder (Vortex) Shoulder mount (Wildlife Revolutions/Reno Nevada) Guide DCS jacket & Attack pant, ICON cap and Guide gloves (KUIU) Alaskan guide frame pack (Cabela’s) Hydrate and Recover / Energy and Focus sports drinks (Wilderness Athlete) Bedroll tarp and Yeti Cooler (Nevada Muleys). $100 gas card (Meadow Valley Wildlife Unlimited) Antelope:   Razor HD 20-60x85 spotting scope, 15x50 Viper HD binoculars, Skyline tripod (includes fluid head) Ranger 1000 Laser Rangefinder (Vortex) Shoulder mount (Golden Aspen Taxidermy) 40 qt. Orca cooler (Silver State Sportsmen – Eureka, NV) Guide DCS jacket, Attack pant, ICON cap and Guide Gloves (KUIU) Elite Scout hunting pack and hat (Cabela’s) Hydrate and Recover / Energy and Focus sports drinks (Wilderness Athlete) The Silver State Tag is similar to the state’s Heritage Tags, sometimes called governors tags or bid tags, and gives lucky recipients the chance to hunt a specific big game animal statewide in those hunt units where there is an established season from Aug. 1 – Dec. 31. But unlike the Heritage Tags which generally sell at auction for thousands of dollars, Silver State Tags are available through Nevada’s normal tag application process at a far lesser price.  Tag applicants pay a nonrefundable application $24 each for mule deer, desert bighorn and pronghorn antelope. An additional $5 is required for the elk application. Tag recipients will be charged the current fees established for the tag received. Applications may be submitted electronically at www.ndowlicensing.com during the regular big game tag application period. The deadline for applying is April 16.  In addition to expanded choice of hunt location, tag holders will also have an extended season in which to harvest their game animal.  For desert sheep, mule deer, elk and pronghorn antelope, Silver State Tag bearers can begin hunting Aug. 1 and hunt through Dec. 31. Tag holders also can use their legal weapon of choice throughout the season’s duration – bow, muzzleloader or rifle.   The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


NDOW Encourages Boaters to get Educated before Boating Season

The temperature may be cool outside, but the Nevada Department of Wildlife is encouraging boaters to enroll in a boating education course before boating season as part of the national Spring Aboard – Take a Boating Education Course campaign.   “We know that an educated boater is safer on the water,” said Tom Guess, president of the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, and lead organization for Spring Aboard. “If a boater has taken a boating safety education course the likelihood of their time spent on the water being a safe and enjoyable experience is much greater for them as well as their passengers. There’s no reason to head out on the water without knowing what you’re doing, and spring is the perfect time to take a course before the summer boating season begins.”  U.S. Coast Guard statistics indicate that of the accidents where the level of operator education was known, 77% of boating deaths occurred on boats where the boat operator had never received boating education instruction.  “Our boating accident investigations show that most people who get in a boating accident have not taken a boating education course,” said Game Warden Captain David Pfiffner, Nevada’s boating law administrator. “It’s common sense that people who know how to boat do it much safer.”  Some boaters are required to take a course. Nevada boaters born on or after January 1, 1983 who operate a motorboat of more than 15 horsepower on interstate waters must complete a boating education course. Nevada also requires nonresidents to meet the education requirement for their home state, but even with requirements in place, many boaters never complete a course.  Forty-nine (49) states and U.S. territories require proof of completion of a boating education course for operators of some powered vessels. For a summary of (insert state’s name) regulations and available courses, visit: (insert web information).   The annual Spring Aboard campaign is led by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators and produced under a grant administered by the U.S. Coast Guard, and it is supported by state, federal and nonprofit partners.  The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, conserves, manages and restores wildlife and its habitat for the aesthetic, scientific, educational, recreational, and economic benefits to citizens of Nevada and the United States, and to promote the safety of persons using vessels on the waters of Nevada. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


Nesting Owls Becoming YouTube Stars on Webcam

A trio of great horned owls have become international celebrities after a livestream camera observing their nests went viral.  The three owls, two females and one male, were spotted by employees at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Reno nesting on the second story ledge of one of their buildings. Nevada Department of Wildlife biologist David Catalano checked on the nest to make sure there were no problems.  "To have these two female owls lay eggs less than a foot from each other, in the rocks of a ledge 30 feet above the ground, right against the window of an office is very unique,” said Catalano.   NDOW and DRI partnered to install a livestream video camera that went live this week. Since going live the owls have been viewed by people from all over the United States and even New Zealand and Great Britain.   “We knew this live feed would get some attention, but I don’t think anyone thought it would blow up like this,” said Aaron Keller, NDOW outdoor education coordinator. “It just goes to show you how passionate people are about wildlife.   DRI and NDOW set up this livestream as a way for the public to observe these amazing birds without disturbing the nest. The owl livestream camera be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOuiNxtECzA . You can also check out other videos on the NDOW YouTube page at  https://www.youtube.com/user/NVDeptofWildlife.  The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, conserves, manages and restores wildlife and its habitat for the aesthetic, scientific, educational, recreational, and economic benefits to citizens of Nevada and the United States, and to promote the safety of persons using vessels on the waters of Nevada. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


NDOW to Offer Prizes for Getting Application in Early

This is definitely not the year to wait until the last day to apply for the big game draw. In an effort to promote early applications this year, the Nevada Department of Wildlife will hold four drawings for a number of prizes from Vortex Optics.   Depending on how early you apply, you could be entered into each of the four drawings.  March 19: Anyone who sets up their account and reviews their bonus points before the draw opens on March 19 will be entered to win one of two 20x60x85 HD spotting scopes, a pair of 15x50 Viper HD binoculars and a Ranger 1800 laser rangefinders.   March 26: Sportsmen who apply before March 26 will be entered to win the 20x60x85 HD spotting scope, the 15x50 Viper HD binoculars and the Ranger 1800 laser rangefinder.  April 2: Anyone who applies for the draw before April 2 will be entered to the 15x50 Viper HD binoculars and the Ranger 1800 laser rangefinder.  April 9: Apply before April 9 and be entered to win the Ranger 1800 laser rangefinder.  NDOW has made several changes this year, including launching a new, streamlined purchasing system (ndowlicensing.com) that focuses on web and mobile platforms. With this new system, sportsmen now have a more modern, simpler, and convenient way to purchase their licenses online and at license agents. Sportsmen are now able to download their licenses to their mobile devices and print them from home.   The deadline for this year’s big game tag draw is Monday, April 16 by 11 p.m.  The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, conserves, manages and restores wildlife and its habitat for the aesthetic, scientific, educational, recreational, and economic benefits to citizens of Nevada and the United States, and to promote the safety of persons using vessels on the waters of Nevada. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


Men Sentenced for Illegally Killing Elk

Two Wisconsin men were sentenced this week in the Seventh District Court of Ely for poaching a bull elk in White Pine County in November of 2015.   Ed Singler of Shiocton, Wisconsin had a valid bull elk tag for hunt units 221,222 and 223, but his adult son Ryan Singler of New London, Wisconsin actually took the shot. The two then falsely claimed that it was the elder Singler who harvested the animal.   Ryan Singler pled guilty to a gross misdemeanor and was sentenced to 270 days in jail (suspended), a $2,000 fine and a $6,000 civil penalty along with forfeiture of the rifle, scope and anything harvested from the elk. Ed Singler also pled guilty to a gross misdemeanor and was sentenced to 270 days in jail (suspended), a $1,000 fine and a $6,000 civil penalty. The two also received 10 days in the White Pine County Jail, which they began serving following the sentencing hearing, and 40 hours of community service to be served with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  The two men will not be permitted to hunt or purchase any hunting license or tag for six years in the 47 states that recognize a Nevada revocation.  “This is such a senseless crime,” said Scott Giles, game warden with the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW). “These individuals had a valid tag in that area, but because they felt the rules did not apply to them they wound up receiving some pretty steep fines and penalties.” The case was done in coordination with conservation officers from the Law Enforcement Division of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, who had brought the possible violation to the attention of NDOW. Wisconsin conservation officers also served search warrants on both Ed and Ryan Singler’s homes, vehicles and cell phones.  “The teamwork between NDOW and the Wisconsin DNR was crucial to the success of this case,” said Tyler Turnipseed, Chief Game Warden for NDOW.   A local guide was also sentenced in the case.  Tyler Brunson of McGill reached a plea agreement with the White Pine County District Attorney’s Office for his testimony. Brunson was convicted of hindering a game warden, which is a misdemeanor and carries with it three years revocation of all license privileges.  To report wildlife crime, sportsmen and members of the public can call Operation Game Thief at (800) 992-3030. To learn more about game wardens and wildlife in Nevada visit NDOW at www.ndow.org.  The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, conserves, manages and restores wildlife and its habitat for the aesthetic, scientific, educational, recreational, and economic benefits to citizens of Nevada and the United States, and to promote the safety of persons using vessels on the waters of Nevada. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org. 


Wildlife Commission Adopts Shed Antler Regulation

The Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners has approved a new regulation that prohibits the taking or gathering of shed antlers from public land in Elko, Eureka, Lander, Lincoln, Nye or White Pine counties from January 1 - April 30 each year.  The regulation originated from petitions coming out of the eastern Nevada County Advisory Boards to Manage Wildlife (CABMW).  These eastern Nevada CABMW have the most concentrated deer and elk winter ranges, most severe winters, and the heaviest shed hunting pressure.  Shed hunting is still open year-round in the other 11 counties in Nevada. The goal is to allow deer and elk herds in eastern and central Nevada to utilize their critical winter range habitats without being disturbed. As shed hunting becomes more popular each year, mounting pressure from shed hunters has forced animals to move onto sub-par habitat and expend crucial energy reserves during critical winter months.  Shed hunting is also creating increased traffic around big game winter ranges and results in habitat impacts and road degradation on both private and public lands.  It was the combination of animal disturbance and habitat degradation that was the basis for the regulation. Last year Nevada saw a significant increase in shed hunting pressure when, due to extreme winter conditions and deep snows, Utah closed their shed antler hunting season in an effort to reduce stress on deer, elk and moose to help more animals make it through harsh winter. The closure was extended through April in an attempt to lessen habitat degradation and disturbance on breeding sage grouse. The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, conserves, manages and restores wildlife and its habitat for the aesthetic, scientific, educational, recreational, and economic benefits to citizens of Nevada and the United States, and to promote the safety of persons using vessels on the waters of Nevada. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.

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