News from NDOW

Game Wardens Seek Assistance with Moose Poaching Case

 Nevada Department of Wildlife game wardens are seeking information on an adult moose that was illegally killed 20 miles southeast of Jarbidge. The dead moose was discovered and reported by a concerned citizen on Christmas Day 100 yards west of the intersection of the Sun Creek access road and the O’Neil Basin Road, near the boundary of hunt units 072 and 075. “The moose was killed sometime in middle to late December in a very visible area,” said NDOW Game Warden Fred Esparza. “It’s very possible someone might have seen something that could be helpful in catching the individuals responsible. Even if you just saw a vehicle parked in that area or a hunter on an ATV or UTV, we would like that information.” There is a $1,000 reward from Operation Game Thief (OGT) for information leading to a conviction of this crime.  Witnesses may call OGT at (800) 992-3030 to report information on this or any other wildlife related crime. This is the third illegally harvested moose in the last three years. The first two shootings were mistakenly killed during cow elk hunts and self-reported. This incident is not believed to be a misidentification as the head was removed and a large portion of the meat was taken. At this time, NDOW does not conduct formal surveys to estimate the population of moose. However, the number of observations and their growing frequency suggest 25-40 moose may permanently reside in the Silver State. “It’s amazing to see the reaction of people when they see a moose for the first time,” said Esparza. “It’s really unfortunate that these poachers just took that special opportunity away from the rest of us.” The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.


Game Wardens Seek Assistance with Bull Elk Poaching Case

Game Wardens are seeking the public’s assistance to help solve a case of a bull elk that was killed and left to waste in the Delano Range in Hunt Unit 081. The bull was found west of Division Canyon approximately 150 yards north of the Thousand Springs Road between the Winecup Ranch and the Gambel Ranch. “We believe the bull was shot sometime between Friday, November 17, and Sunday morning, November 19,” said Nick Brunson, Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) Game Warden.  “Another bull was shot and harvested in close proximity of the one that was left to waste.”  Brunson also said that tire tracks led to the bull that was harvested, where the head and meat were removed, then continued on to within 10 feet of the second bull that was left to waste. It is believed that the same party shot both bulls. “There were a lot of hunters in the area who might have seen something,” explains Brunson.  “We hope that someone will come forward with information that will help us solve this crime. It is a senseless act that should have people upset.” There is a $1,000 reward from Operation Game Thief (OGT) for information leading to a conviction of this crime.  Witnesses may call OGT at (800) 992-3030 to report information on this or any other wildlife related crime. The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.


Willow Creek Reservoir Drawdown and Dam Repairs

The Willow Creek Reservoir, located approximately 75 miles from Elko in Northwest Elko County, has drained completely with a total loss of the reservoir storage and associated warmwater fishery after the gate actuators and valve on the dam gate became broken and stuck open. This resulted in rapid reservoir level drawdown with no repair options available without complete draining of the reservoir to access the broken equipment. Barrick, owner of Willow Creek Reservoir, contacted Nevada Department of Wildlife Fisheries personnel and informed them of the malfunction and decreasing water levels in mid-November. As of November 21 the reservoir had drained completely. NDOW fisheries personnel were unable to salvage game fish due to a wet weather pattern and unfavorable shoreline conditions associated with dropping water levels that limit salvage success and vehicle access. Willow Creek Reservoir is a popular recreation destination for Elko, Humboldt and Lander county residents.  Known for good catch rates and quality size white crappie, the fishery was rebounding nicely from the extended drought of 2012-2015.  Restocking efforts of white crappie, channel catfish and black bass species had occurred and the popularity of the fishery became prominent in the summer of 2017, with noticeable increases in angling and camping presence throughout the summer and fall. Beginning in spring 2018, in coordination with Barrick, NDOW will begin the rebuilding and restocking efforts of Willow Creek Reservoir if habitat conditions and equipment infrastructure allow. It is estimated to take 3-5 years under ideal conditions to return warmwater game fish populations to sustainable levels. Although unfortunate in timing for this year, the productivity of Willow Creek Reservoir has demonstrated that it can produce quality recreational fishing opportunities for Nevada residents and visitors alike. The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.  


Delaware Artist Wins Nevada Duck Stamp Art Contest

When Terri Clifton noticed that the Federal Duck Stamp Art Competition was taking place in Las Vegas in 2018, she mentioned to her husband, wildlife artist Richard Clifton, he should also consider entering this year’s Nevada Duck Stamp Art Contest. That way if he won, his artwork would be on the state stamp when they traveled to Las Vegas. “She was half-joking and half-serious, but when I looked into it and realized that the species was the Common Goldeneye I thought I’d give it a shot,” said Clifton.  It was a pretty good shot as Clifton’s entry was selected as the winner of this year’s Nevada Duck Stamp Art Contest. His painting of a pair of Common Goldeneyes floating on the water will now grace Nevada’s 2018-2019 State Duck Stamp. While Clifton had not entered the Nevada contest for a number of years, he has had quite a bit of success in the Silver State, winning the contest in 1992 and 2000. This year’s win is also an impressive benchmark for Clifton. “I was excited to hear I had won the Nevada contest, partly because I have now won or been commissioned to paint a total of 50 duck stamps.  This includes the 1996 Australia and the 2007-08 Federal,” said Clifton.  The contest was sponsored by the Nevada Waterfowl Association and sanctioned by the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW). The winning entry in the annual art contest was selected by a panel of seven judges including two wildlife commissioners. The Common Goldeneye gets its name from its bright yellow eyes. They are a medium sized duck with large heads. The male goldeneye has a black-green head with a white circular patch between the eye and its bill. Its back is black; the wings are both black and white, while the breast is almost all white. They are diving ducks that will usually forage in flocks. The goldeneye is also a fast flier with their wings making a distinctive whistling sound when they are in flight, which has earned them the nickname “Whistler”. “I had been sitting on some nice Goldeneye reference photos I had taken a few years ago, and had been looking forward to a chance to use them,” said Clifton  “It’s nice to have a good reason to paint a nice looking bird that's not a Mallard or Pintail.” Stamps can be purchased by collectors and the general public to support Nevada’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts. A limited number of prints may also be issued, and are available for fundraising for wildlife-related and other conservation organizations.         The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.  


NDOW Nominates Nevada Ranch for National Award

Based on a nomination by the Nevada Department of Wildlife, the Maggie Creek Ranch (MCR) in Elko was recently honored by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA) with its annual National Private Lands Fish and Wildlife Stewardship Award. 


Hunting Violations Checkpoint Set for Sunday

Law enforcement officers from state and local agencies will conduct a wildlife check point from noon until 6 p.m., Sunday Oct. 8 in Alamo, NV. 

Nominations Sought for Kirch Conservation Award

The state’s Board of Wildlife Commissioners is currently seeking nominations for the 2017 Wayne E. Kirch Nevada Wildlife Conservation Award.

Youth Hunts Slated to Open Saturday

Youth hunts for upland game and migratory bird are opening Saturday.

Wildlife Agencies to Host Waterfowl Hunting Workshop

The Nevada Department of Wildlife and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will host a waterfowl hunting workshop Sept. 16, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Clark County Shooting Complex Education Center, 11357 N. Decatur Blvd. in Las Vegas.

Check out the Brand New Small Game Hunting Guide

This year the Nevada Department of Wildlife is combining the upland game, migratory bird, furbearer and turkey brochures into a new Small Game Hunting Guide. This all new Small Game Hunting Guide is a comprehensive guide that includes information on where to hunt, species distribution maps, game identification, possession limits, licenses, tags, stamp fees, legal hunting hours by species, sunrise-sunset tables, regulations and season dates.
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