Bald Eagle

The Bald Eagle is a massive raptor best known for striking white feathers on their head and tail. This large bird is the national bird of the United States. A large wingspan, sharp talons, great eyesight, and a hooked beak make this bird a major predator. This bird is commonly seen around water where it can be found catching fish or scavenging food off of other animals.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Haliaeetus leucocephalus
CLASSIFICATION
Bird
LIFE SPAN
15-30 Years
SIZE
28-38 ” | 6.5-13.8 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Priority Species
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Non-Game
GAME TYPE
None
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Bald Eagles winter throughout the state of Nevada, and breed in a few areas near Lake Tahoe and the Colorado River.

  • Lakes and reservoirs
  • Rivers and streams
  • Upland Forests

Threats

  • Destruction of Nesting Habitat
  • Lead Poisoning
  • Urban Development
  • Urban Expansion

Natural History

Fish makes up a heavy part of the Bald Eagle diet, which explains why they must nest in vicinity to water sources. However, their diet can be supplemented by small mammals, amphibians, small birds, and crustaceans, alive or dead. Bald eagle nests are exceptionally large, some of the largest nests in the avian world. They use sticks and pliable branches to weave together a nest and may add to it in following years. Pairs may have one to three offspring per brood that hatch with down feathers.

Fun Facts

Bald Eagle calls are weak and squeaky sounding. Movies that feature Bald Eagles usually have a Red-tailed Hawk call because they have a more robust call. The Bald Eagle mating ritual involves pairs locking talons and spiraling downward in flight, breaking apart before hitting the ground.