Bobcat

Bobcats are a medium sized feline known for their stubby tails. Their fur color can be variable, but is often a tan to gray-brown color. Their fur is spotted and striped, which helps them blend into their surroundings. Their ears and the tip of their tail are black. They have short tufts on the tops of their ears and fur that frames their face, making them look like they have sideburns.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Lynx rufus
CLASSIFICATION
Mammal
LIFE SPAN
12-13 Years
SIZE
26-41 ” | 9-33 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
GAME TYPE
Furbearer
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Bobcats thrive in a wide variety of habitat types. Within Nevada, Bobcats typically choose rocky areas with high prey abundance and plenty of coverage. Depending on suitable habitat availability, Nevada residents may spot a Bobcat in their neighborhood!

  • Cold desert shrubland and sagebrush
  • Grasslands
  • Upland Forests

Threats

  • Habitat Loss

Natural History

Bobcats are carnivores that hunt rabbits, rodents, ground birds, coyotes, and other small game. They are typically nocturnal, though they can be spotted hunting at dusk and during the day as well. They are solitary animals, typically only seen with other Bobcats during mating season or females with their young. Bobcats breed once yearly and can have one to six young, called “kittens.” Female Bobcats care for their kittens and teach them how to hunt for about a year before the young are on their own.

Fun Facts

Bobcats are named for their tails which appear to be "bobbed." They will also sometimes be seen swimming or wading in water since they are not as fearfull of the water as other cat species!