Columbia Spotted Frog

This frog is medium-sized with rough skin, skin folds, and a round short nose. Their colors range from brown to dark black with light spots.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Rana luteiventris
CLASSIFICATION
Amphibian
LIFE SPAN
3-13 Years
SIZE
3-4 ” | 0.1-0.22 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Priority Species
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Non-Game
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

In Nevada, these frogs occur in three geographically separated subpopulations in the Jarbidge, Independence, Ruby, and Toiyabe Mountains. The Columbia Spotted Frog is dependent on permanent, clean, fresh water sources in the form of lakes, ponds, streams, marshes, and wet riparian corridors.

  • Lakes and reservoirs
  • Marsh
  • Springs and springbrooks

Threats

  • Habitat Degradation
  • Habitat Loss
  • Water Diversion

Natural History

Columbia Spotted Frogs lay their eggs in water. They are laid at the surface in large, globular masses of 200 to 500 eggs. Tadpoles are black after hatching and their eyes are located on the top of their head. Tadpoles eat mostly vegetation while adults will eat insects, mollusks, crustaceans, and spiders night or day. They are very opportunistic feeders and use their long, sticky tongues to catch their prey. This amphibian doesn’t have many ways in which to defend itself from predators, but its coloring helps it to blend into its surroundings. Gopher snakes, herons, and bullfrogs are common predators of adult frogs. Tadpoles are often consumed by dragonfly nymphs, aquatic beetles, fish, and garter snakes.

Fun Facts

Abundance may be tied to beaver ponds in some locations. When beavers decrease, frogs may decrease as well. This frog is not currently on any lists, but has demonstrated sharp declines and is a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act.