Green-winged Teal

Green-winged Teal are North America's smallest dabbling duck. Males have a chestnut-colored head with a wide green stripe running the length of their head and across their eyes. Females are mottled brown with a thin brown line running the length of their head through their eye. Both sexes have a green wing patch called a wing speculum from which their name is derived.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Anas carolinensis
CLASSIFICATION
Bird
LIFE SPAN
2-10 Years
SIZE
12.2-15.3 ” | 0.3-1.1 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
GAME TYPE
Waterfowl
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Green-winged Teal can be found in many different types of wetlands. Green-winged Teal are early migrants, and thousands can be seen moving through Nevada in late summer.

  • Lakes and reservoirs
  • Marsh
  • Rivers and streams

Threats

  • Drought
  • Habitat Loss
  • Water Diversion

Natural History

Female Green-winged Teals choose their nest sites usually in a protected area on the ground in a meadow, grasslands, or even in a forest, but always close to water. Females lay between 6 and 9 eggs in their nests and incubates the eggs with no assistance from the male. A couple hours after the ducklings have hatched, they are mobile and able to swim around and follow the female around for food.
Green-winged Teals are dabbling ducks and do not fully submerge themselves while foraging usually. They will dive occasionally to escape predators. These ducks prefer to forage in shallow waters. They are not picky about what they eat and will consume a wide variety of aquatic plants and animals including seeds, grasses, aquatic insects, tadpoles, and crustaceans.

Fun Facts

Green-winged Teals are the smallest dabbling duck in North America.