Little Brown Bat

Little Brown Bats are a small widespread bat throughout North America. They have glossy fur that can be dark brown, reddish and even a lighter brown in color. They have small ears and small eyes. Their wingspan can range from 8.5 inches to 11.5 inches. Little Brown Bats use their claws, tongue, and teeth to groom themselves. They spend most of their days grooming, keeping their wings and fur in tip top shape.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Myotis lucifugus
CLASSIFICATION
Mammal
LIFE SPAN
6-7 Years
SIZE
2.5-4 ” | 0.016-0.021 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Priority Species
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Not Evaluated
GAME STATUS
Non-Game
GAME TYPE
None
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Little Brown Bats love to roost in buildings, caves, trees, rocks, and wood piles. They will also migrate hundreds of miles to move from their summer habitats to their winter or hibernacula roost sites.

  • Caves
  • Lakes and reservoirs
  • Upland Forests

Threats

  • Disease

Natural History

The Little Brown Bat ranges across northern Nevada and throughout the Great Basin. They have not been found in the Mojave Desert. They are well adapted to using human-made structures for resting and maternity sites, but will also use caves, trees and rock outcrops. They will hibernate in caves and mines as well. Although, in other populations in the US they are found in large numbers in their roosts, in Nevada they have not been found to gather in large groups. Little Brown Bats are movers and use different types of roosts for daytime, nighttime, hibernation, and for when females give birth. Night roosts are usually not near day roosts to help avoid predation. Hibernation roosts are usually highly enclosed spaces like caves and mines. These bats are very vulnerable to distance traveling, especially during maternity season and hibernation.

Fun Facts

In the Eastern United States, Little Brown Bat populations have been decimated by a fungus called white-nose syndrome. Although, this deadly fungus has not been found in Nevada currently if it does spread to the western states, it would be a significant threat to all Nevada bat species.