Northern Rubber Boa

The Northern Rubber Boa is a small snake with a blunt tail and small eyes. The body is typically brown to olive green with a light belly. They are somewhat pink when they’re young and get darker as they age.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Charina bottae
CLASSIFICATION
Reptile
LIFE SPAN
7-30 Years
SIZE
12-28 ” | 0.06-0.15 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Priority Species
  • Unprotected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Non-Game
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Rubber Boa habitat includes woodlands, forest clearings, patchy chaparral, meadows, and grassy savannas. Generally, this snake is found in or under rotting logs or stumps, under rocks or in crevices, or under the bark of dead fallen trees. They are only found in northern Nevada.

  • Alpine forests of the Sierras
  • Grasslands
  • Pinyon juniper forests

Threats

  • Drought
  • Overcollection

Natural History

The Rubber Boa’s diet includes mice, shrews, lizards, lizard eggs, snakes, and small birds. This species kills prey by constriction. Rubber Boas are largely crepuscular and nocturnal but may be active by day during the breeding season.
Rubber Boas give live birth to between 2 and 8 young. These snakes are long-lived and reach sexual maturity around 2-3 years of age.
These snakes are incredibly docile and secretive. They are slow moving compared to most other snakes but are very good at swimming and climbing. They’re main form of defense is to release a foul-smelling musk. Common predators are raccoons, coyotes, ravens, birds of prey, and bobcats.

Fun Facts

The Rubber Boa's common name is derived from their skin which is often loose and wrinkled and consists of small scales that are smooth and shiny, these characteristics give the snakes a rubber-like look and texture.