Raccoon

Raccoons are highly adaptable and easily recognized by their black mask-like coloring surrounding their eyes and their striped bushy tail. Their hands are similar in appearance to that of humans and offer excellent dexterity. Smell and touch are their most important senses. Raccoons are nocturnal and have excellent night vision.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Procyon lotor
CLASSIFICATION
Mammal
LIFE SPAN
2-5 Years
SIZE
24-37 ” | 4-23 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Unprotected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
GAME TYPE
Furbearer
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

The adaptability of the Raccoon gives them plenty of options when it comes to suitable habitat. However, they prefer forested areas near water sources that offer plenty of food and lots of holes in which they can make a den. They are no stranger to cities, however, and can easily find a place to live.

  • Agricultural Lands
  • Developed Landscapes
  • Rivers and streams

Threats

  • Disease

Natural History

A Raccoon’s diet is made up of a diverse range of plants and animals, even residents’ trash can unintentionally provide for a Racoon (situations such as this can be dangerous and we recommend never feeding or providing for wildlife). Breeding season occurs from December to August and females typically have one litter per year with three to seven young. Racoons are typically inactive during the day and will stay in their den to avoid predation.

Fun Facts

Approximately 75% of the part of a Raccoon's brain that processes sensory signals is devoted to touch. Their paws have four to five times more sensory cells than most mammals.