Spotted Bat

Spotted Bats have black bodies with two white spots on their shoulders and one white spot on the rump. They also sport white fur on their stomach and very large, pink ears which aid them in using echolocation to fly and find food. Their wingspan is about 14 inches long.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Euderma maculatum
CLASSIFICATION
Mammal
LIFE SPAN
1-20 Years
SIZE
4.3-4.5 ” | 0.035-0.044 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Priority Species
  • State Protected
  • Threatened
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Non-Game
GAME TYPE
None
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

The Spotted Bat prefers to live near water sources such as springs, creeks and rivers. Spotted Bats roost in vertical cliffs and ledges until they can come out in the night and hunt. These bats are distributed throughout the state, but in very patchy occurrences.

  • Cliffs and Canyons
  • Lakes and reservoirs
  • Upland Forests

Threats

  • Habitat Loss
  • Urban Development

Natural History

Although not much is known about the life span of the Spotted Bat, many other bat species tend to live in the wild for over 20 years. It’s assumed that the Spotted Bat lives about this long as well. The Spotted Bat is an insect specialist, that means they only eat insects. They eat a variety of different insects, but prefer moths. They will tear off the wings and eat only the abdomen! Spotted Bats, like other bats, will give live birth to one young, called a “pup,” per year. Pups are not born with the distinctive spots of the adults, but this unique coloration will appear by the time they are ready to mate.

Fun Facts

The Spotted Bat's echolocation is able to be heard by the human ear! Echolocation is a technique similar to radar that helps bats find food and navigate through their surroundings.