Trumpeter Swan

Trumpeter Swans are a large species of waterfowl with completely white bodies and a black bill. Juvenile swans have dusty gray feathers for about a year before becoming full white.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Cygnus buccinator
CLASSIFICATION
Bird
LIFE SPAN
5-10 Years
SIZE
4.5-5 ” | 16-28 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
GAME TYPE
Waterfowl
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Trumpeter Swans prefer shallow waters with plenty of vegetation. They will use beaver ponds and agricultural ponds as well as undisturbed bodies of water. In Nevada, Trumpeter Swans can be found in the winter across Northern Nevada. A resident population of Trumpeter Swans can be found in the Ruby Valley.

  • Agricultural Lands
  • Lakes and reservoirs
  • Marsh

Threats

  • Habitat Loss
  • Lead Poisoning
  • Water Diversion

Natural History

Trumpeter Swans form strong pair bonds. Both the male and the female help build the nest, but the female incubates the eggs using her feet. These swans forage in the water with their tails up in the air, looking for aquatic plants to eat. Young swans, called cygnets, primarily eat aquatic invertebrates.
Trumpeter Swans form family units and their young will stick around with their parents for at least a year before going off on their own to breed. These units will migrate together and protect each other. Trumpeter Swans can be very territorial especially during breeding season and will aggressively chase off other swans, potential predators, and any other animal that invades their space.

Fun Facts

The Trumpeter Swan is North America's heaviest flying bird. Trumpeter Swans get their name from their low bugling call that they make while in flight.