Wiper (White/Striped Bass Hybrid)

A hybrid bass produced by crossing a female white bass with a male striped bass. Hybrids closely resemble both striped bass and white bass making identification difficult, particularly for young fish. When comparing adult fish, the hybrid has a deep body and an arched back similar to the white bass. Wipers can often be distinguished by broken or irregular stripes on the front half of body and straight lines on the rear half of body. A mid-body break in line pattern occasionally occurs. In other parts of the country the wiper is known as the sunshine bass, palmetto bass or whiterock bass.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis
CLASSIFICATION
Fish
LIFE SPAN
7-9 Years
SIZE
18-33 ” | 1-26 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Unprotected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Because it is predominantly stocked as a sterile hybrid, it has no native range. It was first produced by hatcheries in the 1980’s and has since been stocked in lakes and reservoirs throughout North America. In Nevada, it has been introduced into Lahontan Reservoir, Wildhorse Reservoir, South Fork Reservoir, and elsewhere. It is generally found in larger, deeper lakes and reservoirs.

Threats

  • Predation from carp eating eggs during spawn

Natural History

A game fish and a food fish, the Wiper became a part of United States aquaculture in the late 1980’s. They are known to be an aggressive feeder which puts them on the angler’s “to catch’ list. The Wiper surfaces to feed on baitfish, making the fish visible and easier to catch on a wide array of lures and baits.