Gray Fox

The Gray Fox is a relatively solitary animal with nocturnal habits. They can be distinguished from the Red Fox by their smaller size and bushy, black-tipped tail. If you find yourself in a Gray Fox habitat, look up! They possess the unique ability to climb trees, setting them apart from other foxes.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Urocyon cinereoargenteus
CLASSIFICATION
Mammal
LIFE SPAN
6-8 Years
SIZE
31-44 ” | 8-15 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
GAME TYPE
Furbearer
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Gray Foxes can be found in open habitat such as woodland brush and mixed forests. Dense vegetative areas serve as resting places and cover from predators. They escape predators by finding cover rather than outrunning them. They will even climb trees!

  • Grasslands
  • Upland Forests
  • Warm desert riparian

Threats

  • Habitat Degradation
  • Predation

Natural History

Gray Foxes are considered nocturnal more active at dusk and into the evening than they are during the day. They usually begin foraging for food before sunset, then return to rest before sunrise. They love to munch on small mammals such as mice, rats, and rabbits; also birds, insects, nuts, fruits, and even agricultural crops like corn! Gray Foxes breed from late winter to early spring. They only have one litter of one to seven young, called “pups,” per year. Pups start to forage for their own food at about three months of age. The family then disperses in late summer and fall.

Fun Facts

Gray Foxes are particularly great at climbing trees! Their species name, cinereoargenteus, roughly translates to “ashen silver.”