Walleye

Named as a reference to the glassy, large pupils of this fish, the Walleye has prominent “canine” teeth that distinguish from its smaller family member the yellow perch. Color is brassy-olive buff sometimes shading to yellowish sides and white beneath. Large dark blotches at rear base of dorsal fin, and the lower lobe of tail fin is white tipped. The tail is moderately forked. Eyes can appear translucent.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Sander vitreus
CLASSIFICATION
Fish
LIFE SPAN
10-20 Years
SIZE
20-33 ” | 4-16 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Unprotected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

Walleye are native to the upper midwest of the United States and southern Canada. They have been introduced extensively throughout North America. Walleye are found in a few western Nevada waters including Lahontan and Rye Patch Reservoirs, the Humboldt River below Rye Patch Reservoir and Chimney Reservoir. It is generally found in larger lakes and reservoirs.

Threats

  • Larger Fish
  • Predation

Natural History

Named for its pearlescent eyes and its ability to see well in low light conditions, the vision of the Walleye will also affect its behavior. They avoid bright light and prefer to feed in low light on prey that are unable to see as well as they do. In addition to low light visibility, the Walleye are also active in choppy water conditions and cloudy days. They use this adaptation as an advantage over their prey.