White Catfish

The White Catfish is bluish gray on top and white below. Their tails fork deeply, have no scales, no spots and their barbels extend from the chin and upper jaw. Both dorsal and pectoral fins have strong, sharp spines. White catfish have shorter barbels on the upper jaw than channel catfish, and barbels on lower jaw are whiter. Their head is more rounded and the white on their belly extends to rear of anal fin.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Ameiurus catus
CLASSIFICATION
Fish
LIFE SPAN
7-14 Years
SIZE
8-33 ” | 1-17 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Unprotected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

White Catfish are native to the Atlantic Coast from Chesapeake Bay south to Florida and Texas. Found in Lahontan and Willow Creek Reservoirs and the Humboldt River system, often co-occurring with Channel Catfish. Generally prefers slower, warmer waters.

Threats

  • Birds
  • Larger Fish

Natural History

Native to the Atlantic drainage systems of the U.S. but now intentionally introduced for sport and food to many other states including Nevada. The White Catfish is a sluggish fish that prefer mud-bottomed pools, open channels, and backwaters of small to large rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. They Feeds on a wide variety of fishes, insects, and crustaceans.