Cave Myotis

The Cave Myotis is a medium-sized bat with dark fur on its back and paler fur on its underside. It has small eyes and small pointed ears. Like their name suggests, these bats prefer caves as their habitat. Otherwise, they will choose other roosting areas such as mines, rock crevices, barns, and even abandoned buildings.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Myotis velifer
CLASSIFICATION
Mammal
LIFE SPAN
10-15 Years
SIZE
3.8-4.5 ” | 0.025-0.031 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • Priority Species
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Non-Game
GAME TYPE
None
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark

Habitat & Range

The Cave Myotis is found primarily at lower elevations in arid habitats that are dominated by creosote bush, palo verde, brittlebush, cactus, and desert riparian shrubs.

  • Caves
  • Mines
  • Mojave desert

Threats

  • Habitat Loss
  • Roost Disturbance

Natural History

The Cave Myotis is insectivorous, meaning they eat insects. They will primarily feed on moths and sometimes beetles and weevils, leaving their cave roosts shortly after sunset to go hunting. Like other bats, they use echolocation to aid in finding prey while in flight. Females will usually give birth to one pup each year, around mid-April and May. They will form large maternity (or nursery) colonies, but the colony will disperse as soon as their young are weaned. Here, pups are protected and nursed by the adult females. Like most other bats, the Cave Myotis gives birth to one pup in late spring or early summer. Young bats will fly on their own by the time they are only five weeks old!

Fun Facts

At adult size, the Cave Myotis has a wingspan of eleven to 13 inches. They are known for their spontaneous, erratic flight which makes them easy to identify while flying.