Ring-necked Pheasant

Ring-necked Pheasants were introduced to the United States from Asia, and are popular upland game birds. Males can be identified with copper and gold plumage, red face, white collar, and long barred tail feathers. Females have copper and brown coloration across their body, with shorter tail feathers and drab facial color.
SCIENTIFIC NAME
Phasianus colchicus
CLASSIFICATION
Bird
LIFE SPAN
1-5 Years
SIZE
20-35 ” | 2-2.6 lbs
STATE CONSERVATION STATUS
  • State Protected
FEDERAL CONSERVATION STATUS
Least Concern
GAME STATUS
Game
GAME TYPE
Upland Game
  1. Washoe
  2. Humboldt
  3. Pershing
  4. Churchill
  5. Mineral
  6. Lyon
  7. Douglas
  8. Carson City
  9. Storey
  1. Elko
  2. Lander
  3. Eureka
  4. White Pine
  1. Esmeralda
  2. Nye
  3. Lincoln
  4. Clark
  • Grasslands
  • Marsh
  • Upland Forests

Threats

  • Disease

Natural History

Ring-necked Pheasants are ground foragers, eatings mostly wild fruits, nuts, and insects. They will use their beaks and feet to turn over soil and pick insects out of the ground. During the early spring, breeding territories are established by male pheasants. Competitors in these territories will fight by fluttering upwards, biting, and scratching each others wattles. Females will gather around one male in his territory, where the male will guard them from advances of other males. Females will create a very basic nest on the ground surrounded by tall vegetation. Chicks are born ready to leave the nest almost immediately.

Fun Facts

Ring-necked Pheasants often harass other ground nesting birds, and females will sometimes lay their own eggs in the nests of these birds. The young will grow up as brood parasites often among Prairie Chickens.